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July 06, 2006

Tsunami miniseries

 
Wandee Sae-hong pays homage June 16, 2006, at a spirit house in front of her home in Baan Nam Kem to victims of the 2004 tsunami that hit her village in southern Thailand. Wandee objected to the making of a BBC/HBO miniseries about the tsunami in her village, which lost about half its 5,000 residents in the disaster. The two-part miniseries is slated to air later this year on BBC2 and HBO. (AP Photo /Sakchai Lalit)

Tsunami miniseries sets off debate (AP)
By MICHAEL CASEY, Associated Press Writer
Thu Jun 29, 4:50 PM ET

KHAO LAK, Thailand - Initially, Boonlue Mongkhol objected to his village being used for a TV miniseries about the 2004 tsunami. He lost his loved ones in the disaster and didn't want to relive the tragedy.

But when the British Broadcasting Corp. advertised for extras, the 38-year-old businessman put aside his personal feelings and spent five days portraying a corpse and a body collector — earning $13 a day.

"My father, niece and nephew died there," said Boonlue, who also lost his house, seafood restaurant and mini market when the massive waves hit Khao Lak on Dec. 26, 2004. "I didn't want to do it but there is no other way to earn money."

The filming of "Aftermath" — a two-part miniseries produced by the BBC and HBO, shot along Thailand's tsunami-battered coast — has set off a debate over the merits of bringing the tragedy to the screen so soon after the disaster.

Supporters say it's an important story, touching on universal themes of hope and loss, while many survivors say reviving the tsunami has hit them with more heartache.

Similar debates among survivors have played out in the United States with "United 93," the first big-screen treatment of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, and in Australia when there was talk of making a movie about the 2002 Bali bombings, the victims of which were mainly Australians.

"You are exacerbating the healing process," said Anie Kalayjian, whose non-governmental Association for Trauma Outreach and Prevention has provided counseling to survivors of the tsunami and last year's Pakistan earthquake.

"On some level, they need to distance themselves from the devastating impact of the event to heal," she said. "Post-trauma means the trauma has to end and you need a certain distance before you can process your feelings and make meaning and sense out of the unimaginable."

Billed as a compelling story of survival and courage, the two-part series to be shown on HBO and BBC Two later this year follows eight characters in the aftermath of the tsunami including a young couple searching for their child, an Englishwoman whose husband and son are missing, and a Thai man who lost his family and village.

 

Continue reading "Tsunami miniseries" »

June 12, 2006

inigo manglano-ovalle: blinking out of existence

 


inigo manglano-ovalle: blinking out of existence

june 23 , 2006 - september 3, 2006

The Rochester Art Center is pleased to be the first Minnesota institution to present a large-scale solo exhibition of new and recent work by Chicago-based artist and recent MacArthur Foundation Fellow, Iñigo Manglano-Ovalle. Working in a variety of media including video, sound, photography, and sculpture, this exhibition represents the largest and most ambitious installation at the Rochester Art Center to date, utilizing all major galleries and devoting over 6,500 square feet to the artist’s unique vision. As such, this exhibition will expose the scope and breadth of the artist’s oeuvre to Minnesota audiences for the first time. For his exhibition at the Rochester Art Center, Manglano-Ovalle will present a wide-variety of works focusing on diverse subjects—climate, immigration and emigration, power and powerlessness, the effects of technology, international politics, identity, and the possibility of violence. Frequently collaborating with scientists, engineers, architects, writers, geneticists, and others, Manglano-Ovalle creates objects that are both technically complex and formally captivating. Two such objects become the foundation of the exhibition—Iceberg(r11i01) and Cloud Prototype #1.

Iceberg(r11i01) is based on concrete scientific data of an existing iceberg drifting in the Labrador Sea. This iceberg was scanned with the assistance of the Canadian Hydraulic Center utilizing both radar and sonar. Using data provided by the Center, the artist worked closely with Chicago architect Colin Franzen to create a 25-foot sculpture comprised of thousands of aluminum tubes and rapid-prototyped joints.

(above)
Cloud Prototype No. 2, 2003
fiberglass and titanium alloy foil 11 x 16 feet
Scale model of 30km-long cumulonimbus thundercloud based on actual storm database provided by the Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences, Univ. of Illinois and the National Computing Center, Beckman Institute, Urbana-Champaign. Courtesy Max Protetch Gallery, New York.

Cloud Prototype #1 is a large-scale sculpture of a cumulo-nimbus thundercloud modeled by the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Working with architect Douglas Garafalo, Manglano-Ovalle has transformed the numerical data scanned from this existing 50 kilometer wide thundercloud into a titanium-clad sculpture produced by computer-controlled milling machines frequently used by the automobile industry.

Both works begin to comment on ephemeral forces such as weather or clouds while examining patterns of migration uninhibited by political or social boundaries. James Rondeau, Curator of Contemporary Art at the Art Institute of Chicago, states: "Iñigo Manglano-Ovalle is engaged in a process of understanding how certain extraordinary forces and systems—man-made and natural—are always and already in the process of remaking the world. As an artist, thinker, and citizen he absorbs and transforms catalytic ideas and paradigmatic events, adapting them within the context of a formal, intellectual, multivalent visual practice. ‘What I want to represent,’ the artist declares, ‘is how the world represents itself to us.’ Over the course of the last decade, his protean achievements include, but are not limited to, activist-inspired public art, sculpture, film, sound, and photography—all of which fuse the politics of contemporary urban culture with poetic meditations on aesthetics, history, and identity." (James Rondeau, Event Horizons, Iñigo Manglano-Ovalle, Fudacion "la Caixa" 2003.)

About the Artist

Iñigo Manglano-Ovalle was born in Madrid, Spain and currently lives in Chicago, Illinois. He is a member of the faculty at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He has received the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, a Media Arts Award (1997-2001) from the Wexner Center for the Arts in Columbus, Ohio, a Media Arts Residency (1998-2000) from the Henry Art Gallery, University of Washington in Seattle, an ArtPace Foundation International Artist Residency Fellowship (1997) in San Antonio, Texas, and a National Endowment for the Arts Visual Artist Fellowship (1995).

Exhibition Catalog

A fully-illustrated exhibition catalog will offer critical essays by Kris Douglas, Chief Curator of the Rochester Art Center, Claire Barliant, Associate Editor of ARTFORUM, and an interview with Manglano-Ovalle by Yasmil Raymond, Assistant Curator at the Walker Art Center.

April 14, 2006

Artistic Disasters / 65 Seconds that Shook the Earth BAMPFA

 

From the Pacific Film Archive Berkeley:

65 SECONDS THAT SHOOK THE EARTH: COMMEMORATING THE 1906 SAN FRANCISCO EARTHQUAKE
THU APR 6 2006 - SUN APR 9 2006

This April marks the hundredth year since the Bay Area was clobbered by a devastating quake along the San Andreas Fault. To mark this centenary milestone, PFA presents a weekend-long film series with a wallop, five faulty programs guaranteed to shake you up. Look for Earthquake, the first Sensurround film with enough bass to meet your bottom line; an illustrated lecture by Gray Brechin about the 1906 destruction, with archival newsreels galore; John Wayne wandering the ruins of the Barbary Coast; and the late-fifties disaster flick The Night the World Exploded, with an on-site seismologist to tell us about its unsound science. We hope you'll be not just shaken but stirred.

Steve Seid

Rare photographs and paintings of the 1906 earthquake and its aftermath are on view in the BAM exhibition The Bancroft Library at 100.


Click titles to view full film notes

THU APR 6 2006

5:30  Artistic Disasters: Works by George Kuchar, Christina McPhee, Dolissa Medina, Bill Morrison, and Semiconductor (Free Screening!)
Artists commandeer nature's ineluctable forces-fire, flood, and tectonic turmoil. Works by George Kuchar, Christina McPhee, Dolissa Medina, Bill Morrison, and Semiconductor.

FRI APR 7 2006
8:00  Earthquake
Super Sensurround Simulation by Meyer Sound! Charlton Heston, Ava Gardner, George Kennedy, and Geneviève Bujold are among the victims of a massive temblor that devastates Los Angeles in the first and greatest of the Sensurround spectacles. Our presentation will rock the theater with waves of bodacious bass. Are you ready to rumble?

SAT APR 8 2006
7:00  Disaster at Dawn: San Francisco and the Great Quake of '06
Illustrated Lecture by Gray Brechin. San Francisco historian Brechin will guide us through the debris-strewn devastation of post-quake S.F., presenting a rare collection of archival footage recorded while the fires still raged.

SAT APR 8 2006
8:45  Flame of Barbary Coast
Love's a disaster: cowboy John Wayne pursues Ann Dvorak, the darling of the San Francisco demimonde, until that earth-shattering day in April '06. “The most edifying screen cataclysm since the Barbary Coast was razed in Metro's San Francisco.”-N.Y. Times

SUN APR 9 2006
6:00  The Night the World Exploded
Peggy Hellweg in Person. A massive quake in Los Angeles sets off a series of global seizures in this late-fifties disaster epic. Our guest from the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory will examine the film's faulty science.

Presented with the support of the UC Berkeley 1906 Earthquake Centennial Alliance. 

March 07, 2006

My Climate Is Changing @ the Dana Centre

 

In collaboration with the BA (British Association for the Advancement of Science) and scientist and writer Barry Gibb, Zev Robinson is curating a half hour screening of films that deal with the impact of man on nature and nature on man as part of an event on Climage change. The artists showing work will be Barry Gibb, Esther Johnson, Laure Prouvost, Mireya Masó, andZev Robinson. 

My Climate Is Changing
Monday 13 March
18.30 - 20.30

d.cafe
The Dana Centre
165 Queen's Gate
London, SW7 5HD
MAP

What does climate change mean to YOU?  This event will showcase a number of short films, expressing up and coming filmmakers’ views on global warming.  Then it's your chance to discuss the issues and share your opinions with a panel of scientists and commentators.

Panel:
Dr Craig Wallace, climate researcher, National Oceanography Centre, Southampton
Dr Sophie Nicholson-Cole, social scientist, Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, Norwich
Marc Cornelissen, Dutch professional adventurer

www.the-ba.net/the-ba/Events/DanaEvents

To book your FREE place, please email events@the-ba.net or call 020 7019 4938

unseen weather video

 

via Rhizome:

unseen weather video

an intruiging weather-determined music video, which is dynamic & ever-changing as it is affected by the weather & local time from the position of the viewer.
[theunseenvideo.com|thnkx Saurabh]

Originally by infosthetics from information aesthetics at March 14, 2006, 23:21, published by Marisa S. Olson

Posted on Monday, March 6th, 2006, 10:12 pm

Eric Deis: Yesterday's Sunset

Edeis_sunset0214

Eric Deis, /Yesterday's Sunset/, 6:26pm, February 14, 2006

via NEWSgrist, February 25, 2006

Eric Deis: Yesterday's Sunset

 part of


Until Then Then

Eric Deis, Paul Ramirez Jonas, Holly Ward, and Elizabeth Zvonar
Curated by Candice Hopkins and Jonathan Middleton

February 24 - April 1, 2006
Opening Reception Friday, February 24, 2006 at 8pm

Western Front Society
303 East 8th Avenue
Vancouver, BC, V5T 1S1

via [Press Machine] 2/23/06:

Yesterday's Sunset Starts Tomorrow
Commuters heading home across the Burrard Street Bridge may catch
a glimpse of Vancouver artist Eric Deis braving the elements to
photograph the sunset. He is taking over seven hundred exposures each
day, as part of a new work entitled Yesterday's Sunset, on display at
Western Front as part of the group exhibition Until Then Then running
from February 24 until April 1, 2006. [...]

Over the course of eight hours, the images from Yesterday's Sunset
play on a high definition monitor inside the gallery space. The
harried hustle and bustle of city life is transformed into a subtly
moving, nearly imperceptible, and highly evocative image.

Until Then Then looks "critically at nostalgia and future utopias,"
explains Jonathan Middleton, Curator at Western Front. "On one hand
overtly nostalgic, Deis' work employs the familiar motif of a sunset
in order to point to... issues such as urban development."

Eric Deis is an emerging artist from Vancouver, Canada. His artwork
explores how the urban environment and the construction of cities
influence the lives of its inhabitants, and vice versa. Through
large-scale photography, sculpture, and video, Deis reconfigures our
perception of the world by exposing the subtle peculiarities of our
everyday environment. 

February 25, 2006 at 09:34 AM in Exhibitions | Permalink