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June 26, 2006

Arts & Ecology Programme, London

 

via Arts & Ecology (new to the Blogroll) - http://www.artsandecology.org:

Arts & Ecology is a programme supporting the work of the arts in examining and addressing environmental concerns in an international arena.

Arts & Ecology explores the current practice of artists, writers, architects and film-makers through a series of conferences, publications and projects that looks at local and global projects that attempt to communicate, challenge and sometimes propose solutions to pollution, waste and loss of natural habitats. The issues at stake – from the broad one of climate change to thespecific problems of desertification, waste and dwindling biodiversities- are being examined through artists’ practices, and through interdisciplinary dialogue with scientists, industrialists, government and environmental groups.

A key notion informing the entire project is that of ecology as a study of an individual’s relationship with their cultural, social and economic, as well as natural, environment. As such this is a broad reaching programme and aims to locate the arts as a central player in providing creative, and sometimes radical, insights and solutions to the challenges facing contemporary society. The information hub of this website provides a growing bibliography and directory of the inspirational work of many artists, writers and agencies that is currently taking place across arts forms.

April 14, 2006

Asking Mutual Funds To Consider Climate Change

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via Eybeam reBlog: 

A group of United States-based NGO's and consumers is petitioning the three largest mutual fund companies in the US to consider the financial impacts of global warming. Fidelity, Vanguard, and American Funds recently received petitions and letters asking them to begin addressing the economic risks of climate change by supporting global warming shareholder resolutions filed with U.S. companies. "In 2005, none of the three mutual fund companies supported such resolutions, which typically request that firms disclose the financial risks and opportunities of global warming and describe their strategies for managing those challenges". The strategy is well conceived, because mutual fund companies themselves have no expertise for directly assessing the potential impact. The best they can do is ask the companies they include in their portfolios to provide some insights into how climate change might shape the long range performance of their stock. Just asking the question is step one. Step two is designing a fund based on the collective strength of its members to mitigate climate change. More about the organizing NGO's after the fold.

(This post continues on the site) Originally from Treehugger, ReBlogged by Yury Gitman on Mar 30, 2006 at 09:38 AM