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Earth Day at Abington Art Center, with New York Times science writer Andrew Revkin & artist Diane Burko

 

Celebrate Earth Day at Abington Art Center

with a book signing & talk featuring New York Times science writer Andrew Revkin & artist Diane Burko 

Sunday, April 23rd at 3pm

"The North Pole Was Here: Puzzles and Perils at the Top of the World" 

In connection with "out of the blue" an exhibition about climate change, its politics and metaphors, Andrew Revkin, the global-environment reporter for The New York Times will be at Abington Art Center to share his new illustrated book on the once and future Arctic. "The North Pole Was Here" is geared toward readers 10 years and up but his talk was developed with the whole family in mind. The book recounts his recent trip to the shifting sea ice at the North Pole with a rugged team of climate scientists who are trying to determine what's behind the dramatic warming of the Arctic climate. All science there is extreme science.

Mr. Revkin will share a lively illustrated talk that draws on the book (published by Houghton Mifflin/ Kingfisher) and his unique adventures not only at the North Pole, but on two other recent Arctic forays, to the summit of Greenland's giant ice sheet and the windblown tundra of Alaska's North Slope. Copies of "The North Pole Was Here" will be available for purchase and Mr. Revkin will sign books after the talk. Signed copies can also be ordered in advance. To put in an order call Heather at 215-887-4882 x240.

Artist Diane Burko from Abington Art Center's current gallery exhibition "out of the blue" will speak at 4pm. She will share images of her travels to Alaska and Iceland which were the inspiration for her new paintings. Diane is a Philadelphia painter and photographer whose recent projects are based on her travels to Iceland, the most active volcanic territory on earth. Diane has received many awards including a Lila Acheson Wallace fellowship and a grant from the Leeway Foundation.

This program has been supported in part by the Pennsylvania Humanities Council, the Federal-State Partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities.The event is FREE and open to the public. 

 

Read a review of "The North Pole Was Here" in Grist magazine:

True North [excerpt]

[...] Built around Revkin's 2003 trip to the pole, the book intersperses the author's observations with vintage photographs and stories culled from the pages of The New York Times, and a sprinkling of history, science, and philosophy. The title comes not from a gloomy global forecast, but from the fact that the geographical Pole is covered by ice that moves much more swiftly than most of us suspect: about 400 yards an hour.

Accessible to 10-year-olds (OK, to precocious 10-year-olds), the book makes fascinating reading for grown-ups as well. As you'd expect in a book aimed at kids, everything is clear. As you might also expect, it contains a huge number of MTV-length snippets. Topics range from the speculations of ancient Hindus and Greeks about what wonders might lie at the pole to the early efforts by white folk to reach it. Revkin also explores the reasons behind the slow collapse of magnetic north, whose strength has declined 10 to 15 percent in the last 150 years.

[Read on...