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January 03, 2008

Pathetic Fallacy: Weather and Imagination

Pathetic Fallacy: Weather and Imagination

January 7 - February 27, 2008

Works by Richard Bosman, Peter Brooke, Fernando Ferreira de Araujo, Malcolm Fenton, Joy Garnett

@

Philoctetes Center for the Multidisciplinary Study of the Imagination

247 East 82nd Street, New York, NY 10028

Artist's Reception: Saturday, January 12, 5:30-7:00pm.

In his five-volume work Modern Painters (1843-60), John Ruskin wrote of the poetic practice of ascribing human characteristics, such as emotions, feelings and sensations, to inanimate objects or to nature, thereby coining the term pathetic fallacy. The Philoctetes Center for the Multidisciplinary Study of Imagination is pleased to present the exhibition, Pathetic Fallacy: Weather and Imagination, which examines diverse ways in which artists and scientists record, capture and analyze the phenomenology of weather. From the roiling background in Edvard Munch’s “The Scream” to Shakespeare’s tempests, weather forms an underlying context across artistic disciplines. How do actual weather conditions affect the sensibility of an artist? How does the climate influence his or her representations, and what of the impact on the viewer? A concurrent display in the Annex will address how scientists, track, quantify, and forecast—via meteorology—the processes and phenomena of the atmosphere.

"Everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it." -Mark Twain

Artists Richard Bosman, Peter Brooke, Fernando Ferreira de Araujo, Malcolm Fenton, and Joy Garnett, through painting, photography and printmaking, consider the implications and consequences of weather on human activity, and vice-versa.

Hallie Cohen, Curator

January 14, 2007

Strange Weather @ The National Academy of Sciences

Flood5

Flood 5, 2006, oil on canvas, 60 x 78 inches

Strange Weather
New Paintings
By Joy Garnett

in two parts:

Part I:
January 15 - April 30, 2007
by appointment,
call (202) 334-2436
 

National Academies' Keck Center
550 Fifth Street NW, First Floor Gallery
Washington, DC


Artist's Talk : Thursday Feb 8, 2007, 6 - 8pm


PRESS RELEASE  [PDF]  

An artist's multiple with essays by Lucy R. Lippard and  Andrew C. Revkin is available upon request. 

Part II:
Opens to the Public
May 5 - July 30, 2007

OPENING RECEPTION
Sunday, May 27, 2007, 1 - 3 pm

National Academy of Sciences
2100 C Street NW, Upstairs Gallery
Washington, DC
 
Open  weekdays,  9am - 5pm

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NAS Announces 'Strange Weather: New Paintings by Joy Garnett'

Washington - "Strange Weather," an exhibition of paintings by Joy Garnett depicting environmental and social catastrophes, will be on view by appointment from Jan.15 through April 30 at the National Academies' Keck Center, 500 Fifth St., N.W., Washington, D.C. It will then be placed on public view from May 5 through July 30 at the National Academy of Sciences' headquarters, located at 2100 C St., N.W., Washington, D.C.

Joy Garnett gathers photographs of man-made and natural disasters from the Internet and renders the images as richly textured oil paintings. In the process, she locates tensions between the visceral power of paint and the fleeting nature of images in the mass media, addressing the evolving role of art in an information-saturated society.

Curated for the National Academy of Sciences, the exhibition focuses on the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. In Strange Weather, Garnett takes widely distributed news images of a devastated New Orleans and recasts them as paintings in which geological, political, and sociological weather are inextricably intertwined.

Based in New York City, Joy Garnett studied painting at the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris and received her MFA from the City College of New York. Her paintings were recently exhibited in "Image War," organized by the Whitney Museum of American Art , New York City, and "Run for Your Lives!" at DiverseWorks, Houston. In 2004, she received a grant from the Anonymous Was a Woman Foundation. In 2000, she received a commission from the Wellcome Trust to participate along with her father, biochemist Merrill Garnett, in "N01se," a multi-site exhibition about information and transformation at Kettle's Yard, Cambridge, and the Wellcome Trust's Two10 Gallery, London. The exhibition was organized by artist Adam Lowe and historian of science Simon Schaffer.

For more than 20 years, the Office of Exhibitions and Cultural Programs of the National Academy of Sciences has sponsored exhibitions, concerts, and other events that explore relationships among the arts and sciences.

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January 10, 2007

Portia Munson: "Green"



via Artnet Magazine, 1/9/07:
PETAL PERFECTION
by Ilka Scobie
Portia Munson, "Green," Jan. 5-Feb. 3, 2007, at P.P.O.W., 555 West 25th Street, New York, N.Y. 10001

Portia Munson’s photographic flower mandalas, though contemporary, fulfill a mystical ideal -- their concentric structure reflects the shape of the outside universe while striving for a celebration of perfection within. Each petal in Munson’s mandalas has been gathered from her own upstate garden or surrounding field or forest. "In another life, I’d like to be a scientist," Munson said, a few hours before the opening of her show at P.P.O.W. The careful dissection and arrangement of the blossoms reflects a craftsperson’s care as much as the luminous hues represent a master colorist.

Munson, a painter, began working directly with flowers in 2002. "I’ve always been a painter, but I also give myself freedom to work in other ways. I can’t express every idea in a painting." Each limited-edition photo, done in pigmented ink on rag watercolor paper (the flowers are arranged directly on a digital scanner, and not subjected to digital enhancement), is the result of one day’s peak harvest, and reflects "what’s in bloom from that day."

 

Plucked only shortly before being photographed, the four-leaf clovers or marigolds are damp with dew -- Munson’s delicately sensual blooms bare little resemblance to the hothouse bouquets sold on city corners. The flora is so intense in hue and freshness that it suggests a psychedelic influence. Munson laughingly explained, "What immediately comes to mind is that I’m very allergic in the spring. So I am  physically intoxicated in terms of psychedelic visuals. I do love color, but I’m trying to make more than pretty colors."

Munson studied with Vito Acconi, Leon Golub, Barbara Kruger, Joan Semel, Martha Rosler and Harriet Shorr. She acknowledges that "my esthetic doesn’t follow theirs, but my approach has certainly been influenced." She also cites Kiki Smith and Fred Tomaselli as artists she finds kinship with.

In Bulbs, the symmetrical arrangement of flowers is marked by grape hyacinths, whose graceful tendrils end in the coda of the hairy hued bulb. "I wanted to show the whole thing," Munson explains. Interspersed with the purple flowers are dissected daffodils, with one perfect daffodil specimen in the center. Green Aftermath is a paean to spring. Adolescent milkweed bulbs, immature berries and weeds form a verdant rainbow, displayed as an artful cornucopia.

Continue reading "Portia Munson: "Green"" »

June 26, 2006

Tourism and the American Landscape @ The Cooper-Hewitt

 

Frederic Edwin Church (American, 1826–1900). Schoodic Peninsula from Mount Desert at Sunrise, 1850–1855. Brush and oil paint on paperboard. Gift of Louis P. Church, 1917-4-332. Photo: Matt Flynn.

Frederic Church, Winslow Homer, and Thomas Moran:
Tourism and the American Landscape

[Link

May 19–October 22, 2006


The Cooper-Hewitt
National Design Museum
New York City 

As nineteenth-century America rapidly evolved into an urban, industrialized society, the natural beauty of the country's vast untouched landscape became the chosen subject matter of many artists, including Frederic Edwin Church, Winslow Homer, and Thomas Moran. These painters recorded, romanticized, and sometimes embellished views of Niagara, Maine, the Catskills, Yellowstone, Yosemite, and other scenic locations, stimulating a burgeoning America to become a nation of tourists.

During the decades following the Civil War, recreational travel became accessible and affordable for the middle class as well as the wealthy. To serve a rapidly growing tourist clientele, hoteliers, real-estate builders, and railroad entrepreneurs developed, and eventually threatened, the same regions chosen by the artists for their pristine, untouched beauty. Frederic Church, Winslow Homer, and Thomas Moran: Tourism and the American Landscape chronicles the ways in which the works of some of America's most significant artists paralleled the evolving interest in and development of the American landscape while at the same time embedding icons of natural beauty in the nation’'s collective consciousness.

April 14, 2006

Earth Day at Abington Art Center, with New York Times science writer Andrew Revkin & artist Diane Burko

 

Celebrate Earth Day at Abington Art Center

with a book signing & talk featuring New York Times science writer Andrew Revkin & artist Diane Burko 

Sunday, April 23rd at 3pm

"The North Pole Was Here: Puzzles and Perils at the Top of the World" 

In connection with "out of the blue" an exhibition about climate change, its politics and metaphors, Andrew Revkin, the global-environment reporter for The New York Times will be at Abington Art Center to share his new illustrated book on the once and future Arctic. "The North Pole Was Here" is geared toward readers 10 years and up but his talk was developed with the whole family in mind. The book recounts his recent trip to the shifting sea ice at the North Pole with a rugged team of climate scientists who are trying to determine what's behind the dramatic warming of the Arctic climate. All science there is extreme science.

Mr. Revkin will share a lively illustrated talk that draws on the book (published by Houghton Mifflin/ Kingfisher) and his unique adventures not only at the North Pole, but on two other recent Arctic forays, to the summit of Greenland's giant ice sheet and the windblown tundra of Alaska's North Slope. Copies of "The North Pole Was Here" will be available for purchase and Mr. Revkin will sign books after the talk. Signed copies can also be ordered in advance. To put in an order call Heather at 215-887-4882 x240.

Artist Diane Burko from Abington Art Center's current gallery exhibition "out of the blue" will speak at 4pm. She will share images of her travels to Alaska and Iceland which were the inspiration for her new paintings. Diane is a Philadelphia painter and photographer whose recent projects are based on her travels to Iceland, the most active volcanic territory on earth. Diane has received many awards including a Lila Acheson Wallace fellowship and a grant from the Leeway Foundation.

This program has been supported in part by the Pennsylvania Humanities Council, the Federal-State Partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities.The event is FREE and open to the public. 

 

Read a review of "The North Pole Was Here" in Grist magazine:

True North [excerpt]

[...] Built around Revkin's 2003 trip to the pole, the book intersperses the author's observations with vintage photographs and stories culled from the pages of The New York Times, and a sprinkling of history, science, and philosophy. The title comes not from a gloomy global forecast, but from the fact that the geographical Pole is covered by ice that moves much more swiftly than most of us suspect: about 400 yards an hour.

Accessible to 10-year-olds (OK, to precocious 10-year-olds), the book makes fascinating reading for grown-ups as well. As you'd expect in a book aimed at kids, everything is clear. As you might also expect, it contains a huge number of MTV-length snippets. Topics range from the speculations of ancient Hindus and Greeks about what wonders might lie at the pole to the early efforts by white folk to reach it. Revkin also explores the reasons behind the slow collapse of magnetic north, whose strength has declined 10 to 15 percent in the last 150 years.

[Read on...

 

March 18, 2006

Blown Away at "Out of the Blue"

via NEWSgrist: Blown Away at "Out of the Blue"

Looking skyward for a spark

Artworks inspired by natural phenomena are the impetus of a new show.
By Edith Newhall
For The Philadelphia Inquirer, Fri, Mar. 17, 2006

It used to be that creative people tapped into the metaphorical possibilities of strange weather. I'm thinking in particular of Martin Johnson Heade's gorgeously glowering painting, Approaching Thunderstorm, which is said to have reflected his sentiments about the impending Civil War.

Headethunderstorm_1
Martin Johnson Heade (1819–1904). Approaching Thunder Storm, 1859.
Oil on canvas; 28 x 44 in. (71.1 x 111.8 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

In these more self-absorbed days, however, human creativity itself is increasingly compared to atmospheric and geological phenomena. "Out of the Blue," a group show of 22 contemporary artists at the Abington Art Center, asks one to consider the creative process as a kind of natural phenomenon. Why not?

Artists Joy Episalla and Joy Garnett, who conceived the exhibition, and Abington Art Center director Amy Lipton, who organized it, have tested their thesis with a broad range of works. Among the most clearly atmospheric and geological-event-evoking works include Diane Burko's painting of a volcano in Iceland; Emily Brown's painting of a jet trail floating in an otherwise blue sky; Dawn DeDeaux's photograph of a tree ravaged by Hurricane Katrina; and Garnett's two paintings of volatile skies, from her aptly titled "Strange Weather" series.

Dedeaux
Dawn DeDeaux's digital photograph "Shrouded Tree #1," can be seen
in the Abington Art Center's "Out of the Blue" exhibition through May 6.

The show's more abstract works are phenomena in themselves - among them, a pile of cellophane-wrapped candies by Felix Gonzalez-Torres installed to look as if they were spilling, lavalike, out of a fireplace; a shiny blue Mylar and urethane-resin wall piece by Carrie Yamaoka that resembles both a TV screen and a view through a jet's window; and a sculpture by Fluxus artist Geoffrey Hendricks that is composed of a suspended bird cage and watercolor paintings.

Fortunately, the exhibition does not take itself too seriously. It allows for the inclusion of a knitted baby's cap by Andrea Zittel and a molded plastic Frosty the Snowman, as well as museumlike glass vitrines containing such influential ephemera inspired by natural phenomena as Richard Long's artist book, A Walk Past Standing Stones (1980); a photograph of Robert Smithson's Glue Pour, 1970 by Christos Dikeakos; and a 1969 book, Airborne Camera: The World From the Air and Outer Space, by Beaumont Newhall. Heade would have been blown away.

Abington Art Center, 515 Meetinghouse Rd., Jenkintown, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays (Thursdays to 7 p.m.), 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturdays. Through May 6. Information: 215-887-4882 or www.abingtonartcenter.org.

February 16, 2006

Diane Burko: Flow

 

Palami Pali with David Okita, #2, 2002, inkjet print, 20 x 30 inches, courtesy of Locks Gallery, Philadelphia

Diane Burko: Flow
February 9—April 2, 2006
Koppelman Gallery, Tufts University

Opening Reception: Thursday, February 9, 5:30–8:30 pm

Diane Burko's exhibition of paintings and photographs focuses primarily on spectacular and panoramic "extreme landscapes" of volcanoes, craters, waterfalls, and glaciers from Iceland, Italy, Hawaii, and Washington State depicted from disembodied and aerial vantage points. She explores the constant, if not always visible, natural processes and states of lava, as well as water's transformation among solid, liquid, and ether. Her dovetailed subjects are the very notion of spatial and temporal natural transformation and an investigation of the fluid boundary between representation and abstraction. Instead of inventing landscapes as a reflection of interior states of mind—a much more common practice nowadays in the art world—Diane Burko is an uncommon artist-explorer of the majesty of the land and its psychological and spiritual effects on us.

This exhibition will travel to the James A. Michener Art Museum in Doylestown, PA from June 10-October 15, 2006.

curatorial statement for this exhibition [PDF]
Open House and Artist Talk:
Thursday, February 23 from 5:30-8:30pm
Artist Talk at 7:30pm
In conjunction with the College Art Association's 94th Annual Conference.

Diane Burko's work will also be included in Out of the Blue, opening March 4 at the Abington Art Center, Jenkintown, PA. 

February 01, 2006

"Out of the Blue" in Abington


[image source]

via Artnet News (1/31/06):

"OUT OF THE BLUE" IN ABINGTON
Art globetrotters, put a new pin on your map! The Abington Art Center in Jenkintown, Pa., opens "Out of the Blue," Mar. 4-May 6, 2006, a group show about weather and the creative process conceived by artists Joy Episalla and Joy Garnett and organized by Abington Art Center curator Amy Lipton. The show features 22 artists from the U.S., Canada and England, and "focuses on the dynamics of human creativity as a metaphor for geological and atmospheric phenomena." The show includes works by Stephen Andrews, Robert Bordo, Emily Brown, Diane Burko, Dawn DeDeaux, Christos Dikeakos, John Dougill, Joy Episalla, Joy Garnett, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Erik Hanson, Geoffrey Hendricks , J.J. L'Heureux, Bill Jones, Zoe Leonard, Frank Moore, Eileen Neff, Andrea Polli , Hunter Reynolds, Austin Thomas, Bing Wright and Carrie Yamaoka, with a selection of ephemera and multiples by Colin Keefe, Richard Long, Ben Neill, Kiki Smith, Patti Smith, Robert Smithson and Andrea Zittel. For further details, see http://outoftheblueproject.org